How many African adults know that Black pharaohs ruled Egypt for centuries? That the Nubians were not slaves but the pharaohs’ elite troops? That Nubians built pyramids in Sudan that were the architectural wonders of their time? That the Kingdom of Mali had coins and trade long before Europeans came to shore? That China discovered Kenya in 1421, long before the Portuguese? How many Africans know that — long before Aimé Césaire — the famous French writer Alexandre Dumas was Black? That his father, the great General Thomas Alexandre Dumas,who served under Napoleon’s command in 1793, was the first Black general to serve in the French army? That during World War II, Erwin Rommel, Germany’s “Desert Fox,” was more afraid of African troops than French troops? That colonial troops played a crucial role in World War I and World War II? How many Africans are still buried in bigotry, hatred, and tribalism because they have no tools to learn otherwise? How many Africans have laid their hands on publications like African Business, Harvard Business Review, or Entrepreneur?

 

Now. . .

IMAGINE: African students being able to learn on tablets like their Western or Asian counterparts;

IMAGINE: African students being able to learn from constantly updated textbooks;

IMAGINE: African students sharing information, content, and feelings on their phones, tablets or any device;

IMAGINE: African students learning their countries’ and their continent’s history the way it really happened, not the way others have reported it.

IMAGINE: African students and adults being able to download and read business, cultural, and technological publications—even in remote locations;

IMAGINE: Africans being able to learn about other religions via intelligent data, not through the lenses of bigotry and unfounded hatred.

IMAGINE: African adults being able to express their views about a leader and actually be heard without taking to the streets and crippling their economy?

IMAGINE: Africans in remote locations being able to access a preloaded, common-illness library and view symptoms on their tablets;

IMAGINE an African e-community that was driven by their common values, regardless of the member’s religion, sex, appearance, affiliation, or any other characteristic.

IMAGINE this e-community to become a marketplace, driven by meritocracy and passing out universal values; where cash would no longer be the only currency. A Pan-African e-marketplace that would recognize hard work, that would reward its members in recognition for excelling in their university classes, workplace or for being an asset to your community;

IMAGINE 1 billion consumers waiting for all of these opportunities and more. . .  

 

NOW IMAGINE A COMPANY WHOSE SOLE PURPOSE IS TO PROVIDE THIS DIGITAL ECOSYSTEM AND THESE SOLUTIONS.  

IMAGINE NO MORE.

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